Posts in Category: Saskatoon

Edwards School of Business

Edwards School of Business

The building was originally built in 1912 as the Willoughby Sumner Block, occupied by residential units on the top 3 floors and retail merchants on the main floor. The building saw a few major renovation projects throughout the years and transformed to a commercial building with a change of name to Bevan Building and then to London Building. Some of the major tenants were the Department of Veteran Affairs and Revenue Canada.

The building sat vacant for a number of years after that until Victory Companies bought it in 1994. Victory gutted, renovated and converted the use of the building in 1998 and called it The Vienna building. It included 30 residential condominium units on the top 3 floors and the Vienna Boutiques with 17 retail outlets on the main and lower levels.

The University of Saskatchewan’s College of Commerce, known as the Edwards School of Business, opened this downtown campus in the fall of 2009. The K.W. Nasser Centre hosts programs such as the Master of Business Administration, Aboriginal Business Administration Certificate Program and Business Administration Certificate.

Offline Trolls

Offline Trolls at the University of Saskatchewan

“A Residence Building to cost not more than $100,000″ was among the first three buildings authorized by the Board of Governors in June, 1909. The University had made a decision to have a residence rather than fraternity system for their student housing, believing residences were more democratic; a decision which also influenced the overall campus plan.

Designed by Brown and Vallance and built roughly in the shape of a capital “F,” with a dining hall and kitchen, was intended to “hold comfortably about one hundred and fifty.” In his first report, Murray noted that one wing of the building, with room for 30 people, “will be shut off from the main building and devoted to the use of the women students until their numbers force the building of a separate residence.” The dining room remained a common facility even following the construction of a second residence, Qu’Appelle Hall, and together with facilities in the Memorial Union Building, remained the main dining area for students until the construction of Marquis Hall in 1964.

Initially referred to by Walter Murray as “University Hall,” in November 1915 the Board assigned its Executive Committee authority to name campus buildings, but suggested “that the name Saskatchewan Hall be an appropriate one for the first Students’ Residence.”

The building was completed in 1912 for $230,000 — over double the original estimates.

E.A. Davies Building

E.A. Davies Building

The Saskatoon Normal School was opened in 1922 as an institution for training teachers. This facility was opened at the same time a school in Moose Jaw, to complement the original school in Regina.  It was designed by provincial architect, Maurice W. Sharon and his assistant David Webster.

This building and the one in Regina were taken over in 1940 by the Royal Canadian Air Force to accommodate military training. After World War II teacher training resumed in Saskatoon and Moose Jaw, but was discontinued in Regina because of declining enrolment.

In 1964, the Regina and Saskatoon Teachers Colleges, as the normal schools were then called, were transferred to the University of Saskatchewan. At some point after that, the building became part of the SIAST Kelsey campus and renamed the E.A. Davies Building.

City Park Collegiate Institute

City Park Collegiate

City Park Collegiate is a high school in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, located in the City Park neighbourhood. The alternative education program at City Park Collegiate Institute (CPCI) was established in 1986 to meet the needs of students having difficulty in the regular school setting. In 2003–2004, the timetable was expanded to a fully modified program. This program offered modified versions of compulsory high school courses along with many regular-level, hands-on electives. An alternative program is still offered for those students who require it. The result is programming for students in

Grades 8 to 12 designed to prepare them for the world of work or help them gain entry into a number of SIAST[clarification needed] courses.

City Park collegiate served as a mainstream high school from its opening in 1929 to 1984 when it closed as a result of the opening of Marion M. Graham Collegiate in the city’s Silverwood neighborhood. The school’s former athletic program’s teams were known as the Cowboys.

Saskatchewan Polytechnic

Saskatchewan Polytechnic

Saskatchewan Polytechnic in Saskatoon

E.A. Davies Building

SIAST on Ontario

SIAST Mining Program

SIAST has rebranded itself as Saskatchewan Polytechnic as part of it’s degree granting expansion.  It looks like the Kelsey Campus branding has disappeared as well as they are now calling it by the generic Saskatchewan Polytechnic, Saskatoon campus now.

 

Mayfair Community School

Mayfair Community School

Prior to the completion of the first stage of Mayfair School, pupils of the district were accommodated in temporary frame structures. The basement for the brick school at Mayfair had been completed in 1914. However, further progress on construction was not resumed until six years later. In January 1919, the Board realized that the use of the framed buildings would no longer meet the accommodation needs of the Mayfair district. Tenders were called for the completion of the permanent structure. A. W. Cassidy and Company was offered the contract, and work commenced in August of that year. The amount of the tender and sub-trades was a total of $212,484.00. This first stage of the building structure provided ten classrooms.

In 1952 an addition of four classrooms and an auditorium, was completed in 1952 at a total cost of $133,393.00.

Dairy Queen on 33rd Street

Dairy Queen on 33rd

Dairy Queen on 33rd Street

 

The always dirty looking Dairy Queen on 33rd Street.  Saskatoon changes but this Dairy Queen always looks the same.  Shabby.  It’s too bad.  I think some investment in this place would do a lot to help improve the neighbourhood.  Sadly it seems to never happen.

Nuit Blanche

Nuit Blanche spoken word venue

Sound pollution at aka gallery

Jenga

Jenga at Nuit Blanche

Jenga

The view of Atmospere Interior Design during Nuit Blanche

On stilts during Nuit Blanche

Park Cafe and Diner

Eden's Sprout at Nuit Blanche

Oliver at Nuit Blanche

Parallex

Meewasinota CRF at Nuit Blance

Meewasinota CRF

Tweet Wall

Parallex

Eden's Sprout

Eden's Sprout at Nuit Blanche

Crowd at Nuit Blanche

Nuit Blanche

Nuit Blanche

Band at Nuit Blanche

Little Chief Community Station

Cashworld

Riversdale Deli

Nuit Blanche was September 27th on 20th Street in Saskatoon.  It was an amazing contemporary arts festival up and down 20th Street.  We had a great evening exploring shops, taking in art  installations, and meeting up with friends.

What surprised me was how much Mark and Oliver enjoyed themselves.  Oliver was enthralled with the blacksmith while Mark manage to do the Harlem Shake in Parallax.  It wasn’t designed for families but I saw a lot of families exploring installations, playing Jenga (which was made by The Two Twenty) or playing pickup sticks (created by Sean Shaw).

A great inaugural event in Saskatoon and one I hope continues to grow and celebrate the arts in Saskatoon.

The West Side

The westside of Saskatoon

A look at the westside of Saskatoon; Saskatoon City Hospital, the Mendel Art Gallery and Civic Conservatory, The Prairie Lily, and in the distance the Robin Hood and Parrish & Heimbecker Mills.  Oh yeah, you may have noticed the trees.  What an incredible urban forest Saskatoon has.

Irene & Leslie Dubé Centre for Mental Health

Irene & Leslie Dubé Centre for Mental Health

Irene & Leslie Dubé Centre for Mental Health

An inpatient mental health facility which opened in May 2010 after two years of construction as part of the Royal University Hospital complex.