Great Western Brewing Company

Great Western Brewing Company

Great Western Brewing Company

Great Western Brewery

The brewery’s history extends back to 1927, when it was established as the Hub City Brewing Company. In 1930 the plant was renamed the Western Canada Brewing Company, and in 1932 it was changed again to Drewery’s Limited. In 1956, the brewery was acquired by O’Keefe Brewing (which would later become Carling O’Keefe) and was operated under that name until 1989, when Carling O’Keefe was itself acquired by Molson. Bought out by workers that same year and has become the Great Western Brewing Company.

Wanuskewin Heritage Park

Wanuskewin Heritage Park

Wanuskewin Heritage Park

Wanuskewin Heritage Park

Wanuskewin Heritage Park

Wanuskewin Heritage Park

Wanuskewin Heritage Park

Wanuskewin Heritage Park

For more than 6,000 years people have gathered at this place. The nomadic tribes who roamed the Northern Plains came to hunt bison, gather food and herbs, and to find shelter from the winter winds. Some of the sites uncovered date back thousands of years. Wanuskewin is also the site of an arrangement of boulders called a medicine wheel, of which fewer than 100 remain on the northern plains.

Within its 240 hectares (about 600 acres) there are 19 sites that represent the active and historical society of Northern Plains Peoples composed of Cree, Assiniboine, Saulteaux, Atsina, Dakota, and Blackfoot. On site there are summer and winter camp sites, bison kill sites, tipi rings, and artifacts such as pottery fragments, plant seeds, projectile points, egg shells and animal bones, all within a compact area.

Wanuskewin Heritage Park officially opened in June 1992; however scientific investigations in the area began in the early 1930s. Today, the University of Saskatchewan manages an archaeological research program at Wanuskewin with active archaeological digs. 

University Bridge at Night

University Bridge in Saskatoon at night

A night shot of University Bridge, Royal University Hospital, and the President’s Residence.

Church at Saskatoon

Church at Saskatoon

The well maintained but drab and boring Church of Saskatoon.

I am not really a big fan of most church marketing but the Church at Saskatoon seems to take it the opposite extreme.  I can’t find a website, email, or anything that mentions them.  With no sign or anything else, I have no idea how you would even find out about them.  That being said, their grass looks nice so there is that.

Experience Downtown Sidewalk Sale

Experience Downtown Sidewalk Sale

Experience Downtown Sidewalk Sale

Experience Downtown Sidewalk Sale

Experience Downtown Sidewalk Sale

Experience Downtown Sidewalk Sale

Some shots of the 2014 Experience Downtown Sidewalk Sale in downtown Saskatoon.

Delta Bessborough Hotel

Delta Bessborough Hotel

Delta Bessborough Hotel

Dark Saskatoon Alley

A dark Saskatoon alley

When I took this photo, it was pitch dark.  I thought I was only shooting a photo down an empty alleyway.  Then the women on the right came running out and demanded to see the photo while yelling at Wendy and I.  I showed her and she seemed okay.  As she was walking back down the alley, she yells back and says, “I just didn’t want anyone to see my f*ck show”.  So yeah, apparently this is a photo of a trick. 

Oh yeah, my Pentax 50mm f1.8 shows things my eye does not.

The Bus Stop Refreshments

 

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A typical line in the summer outside of Saskatoon’s Bus Stop Refreshments on 21st Street.

Bowerman House

Bowerman House in Saskatoon

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Family out of a walk at the old Sanatorium site in Saskatoon

The Bowerman House (built in 1907) is a designated Municipal Heritage Property located in the Holiday Park. The home is of a crafts-man “Western Stick” style. The house was built as a hunting lodge by Allan Bowerman, graduate from Kingston Military College, first postmaster in Saskatoon on the west side of the river, and member of Saskatoon’s first town council (1903 – 1905). Bowerman was also responsible for the development of the Canada Building. The home was designed by Walter William LaChance. Bowerman sold the home in 1917 after the end of a construction boom in the city.

In 1923 the building was obtained by the Saskatchewan Anti-Tuberculosis League and became part of the Saskatoon Sanatorium serving as a doctor’s residence until 1987. It was used as the sanatorium superintendent residence, for Dr. Boughton and his family, from 1925 to 1959.

The property is now owned by the Meewasin Valley Authority and is used as a private residence.

Carpenters Church

Carpenter's Church

Initially a Mennonite church, was sold to the Church of God.  It later changed it’s name to Carpenter’s Church.